Category Archives: Black History

Terry McMillan


terry_mcmillanTerry McMillan (born October 18, 1951, in Port Huron, Michigan) is an American author. Her interest in books comes from working at a library when she was sixteen. She received her BA in journalism in 1986 at University of California, Berkeley. Her work is characterized by relatable female protagonists.

Her first book, Mama, was published in 1987. She achieved national attention in 1992 with her third novel, Waiting to Exhale, which remained on The New York Times bestseller list for many months. In 1995, Forest Whitaker turned it into a film starring Whitney Houston. In 1998, another of McMillan’s novels, How Stella Got Her Groove Back, was made into a movie. McMillan’s novel Disappearing Acts was subsequently produced as a direct-to-cable feature, starring Wesley Snipes and Sanaa Lathan. She also wrote the best seller A Day Late and a Dollar Short. The Interruption of Everything was published on July 19, 2005. Getting to Happy, the long-awaited sequel to Waiting to Exhale, was published on September 7, 2010.Who Asked You

The 1992 publication of Waiting to Exhale sold over three million copies by 1995, the time of its film adaptation, The novel announced and contributed to a landmark shift in Black popular cultural consciousness and production. McMillan was instrumental to the construction and visibility of a female Black middle-class identity in popular culture. The novel develops female protagonists expressing heartbreak, sadness, loneliness, and sexual desire.McMillan thus introduced the interior world of black women professionals in their thirties who are successful, alone, available, and unhappy.The novel embraced a rhetoric of Black women openly venting about men and embracing a desire to be taken care of. The novel’s themes are resonated in a number of successful R&B Projects such as TLC’s No Scrubs and Destiny’s Child’s Bills, Bills, Bills.

Advertisements

Comments Off on Terry McMillan

Filed under Black History

Ralph Ellison


Ralph Ellison  Ralph Waldo Ellison, born on March 1, 1914 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, studied music before moving to New York City and working as a writer. He published his bestselling, acclaimed first novel Invisible Man in 1952; it would be seen as a seminal work on marginalization from an African-American protagonist’s perspective. Ellison’s unfinished novel Juneteenth was published posthumously in 1999.

Ellison started writing what would become The Invisible Man while at a friend’s farm in Vermont. The existential novel, published in 1952, focused on an African-American civil rights worker from the South who, upon his move to New York, becomes increasingly alienated due to the racism he encounters. Upon its release, Invisible Man became a runaway hit, remaining on bestseller lists for weeks and winning the National Book Award the following year. With millions of copies eventually printed, the novel would be regarded as a groundbreaking meditation on race and marginalized communities in America, influencing future generations of writers and thinkers.Ralph Ellison 2

Invisible Man continues to be held up as one of the most highly regarded works in the American literary canon.

Learn more about Ralph Ellison at:

http://www2.uncp.edu/home/canada/work/allam/1914-/lit/ellison.htm

1 Comment

Filed under Black History

Langston Hughes, Poet and Playwright


Langston HughesJames Langston Mercer Hughes was born on February 1, 1902, in Joplin, Missouri and died on May 22, 1967, in New York, New York.

His first successful poem “The Negro Speaks of Rivers” was published in The Crisis magazine in 1920 and met with high praise.  In 1921 he enrolled in Columbia University where he studied briefly, and during which time became a part of Harlem’s burgeoning cultural movement, commonly known as the Harlem Renaissance. Hughes later dropped out of school, traveled around the world doing various jobs.  In 1925, he met Vachel Lindsay, showed some of his poems to Lindsay who was impressed enough to use his connections to promote Hughes’s poetry and bring it to a wider audience.

In 1940, at 28 years old, Hughes published his autobiography, The Big Sea.  Around that same time he began contributing to a column in the Chicago Defender, for which he created a comic character name Jesse B. Semple, better known as “Simple,” a black Everyman that Hughes used to further explore urban, working-class black themes, and to address racial issues.  The columns were highly successful and “Simple” would later be the focus of sever of Hughes’s books and plays.The Collected Poetry of Langston Hughes

From the 1940s until his death, Hughes continued prolific output of poetry, plays and other works.  On May 22, 1967, Langston Hughes died from complications of prostate cancer.  A tribute to his poetry, his funeral contained little in the way of spoken eulogy, but was filled with jazz and blues music.  Hughes’s ashes were interred beneath the entrance of the Arthur Schomberg Center for Research in Black culture in Harlem.  The inscription marking the spot features a line from Hughes’s poem “The Negro Speaks of Rivers.”  It reads: “My soul has grown deep like the rivers.”

His work continues to be published and translated throughout the world.

For more information go to: http://www.poets.org/poet.php/prmPID/83

Suzanne Bogue

Comments Off on Langston Hughes, Poet and Playwright

Filed under Black History, blogs

Science Fiction Writer, Octavia Butler


Octavia Butler Octavia E. Butler

Born June 22, 1947 in Pasadena, CA

Died February 24, 2006 in Lake Forest Park, WA

Octavia Butler broke new ground both as a woman and an African American in the world of science fiction writing normally dominated by men.

Her father died when she was young and she was raised by her mother who worked as a maid to support the family. Despite suffering from dyslexia, she developed a deep love for books and decided to make writing her career at age 10.  She earned an associate degree from Pasadena City College and later studied under Harlan Ellison at the Clarion Fiction Writers Workshop.

In 1976, Butler published her first novel, Patternmaster. This book was the first in a series of works about a group of people with telepathic powers called Patternists. OtherPatternist titles include Mind of My Mind (1977) and Clay’s Ark (1984).

In 1979, Butler’s career took off with Kindred. The novel tells the story of an African American woman who travels back in time to save a white slave owner—her own ancestor. In part, Butler drew some inspiration from her mother’s work.kindred by Octavia Butler

“I didn’t like seeing her go through back doors,” she once said, according to The New York Times. “If my mother hadn’t put up with all those humiliations, I wouldn’t have eaten very well or lived very comfortably. So I wanted to write a novel that would make others feel the history: the pain and fear that black people have had to live through in order to endure.”

For some writers, science fiction serves as means to delve into fantasy. But for Butler, it largely served as a vehicle to address issues facing humanity. It was this passionate interest in the human experience that imbued her work with a certain depth and complexity. In the mid-1980s, Butler began to receive critical recognition for her work. She won the Hugo Award in 1984 for the best short story of the year, for “Speech Sounds.” That same year, the novelette “Bloodchild” won a Nebula Award and later a Hugo.  In 1995 she became the first science fiction writer to receive the MacArthur Fellowship, nicknamed the Genius Grant.

For more information about this amazing science fiction writer go to: http://octaviabutler.org/

Suzanne Bogue

 

 

 

Comments Off on Science Fiction Writer, Octavia Butler

Filed under Black History, Science Fiction

Martin Luther King, Jr.


Martin Luther KingMonday celebrated Martin Luther King, Jr. and his legacy.  February is Black History month.   I plan to ask the Board of Directors for PPW to join me in celebrating Black History month by writing blogs about black writers.

King was an eloquent writer of moving speeches and sermons.  Dr. King also an orator and a freedom fighter.  He advocated non-violent change in a time of extreme violence and hate.

I don’t feel that I am capable of expressing the truth of Dr. King’s story, so I would prefer to direct to a website that can tell you exactly who he was and what he accomplished in his brief life.  Please take time to read about this man and his deeds.

http://www.thekingcenter.org/about-dr-king

Then, return here next week to read about other Black American writers.

Suzanne Bogue

 

Comments Off on Martin Luther King, Jr.

Filed under Black History

In Honor of Black History Month


Black History MonthThe month of February is Black History month.  I did a little research to find out more about some of the African-American writers who deserve to be honored this month.

We are all familiar with writers, such as Terry McMillan author of Waiting to Exhale (1992); and Toni Morrison, 1993 Nobel Prize winner and author of Beloved (1987) for which she won a Pulitzer Prize. The list also includes such writers as Alex Haley whose book Roots:  The Saga of an American Family (1976) was adapted to a popular television mini-series in 1977.

But the list of African-American writers of note not only includes these famous individuals and those such as poets Langston Hughes and Maya Angelou as well as novelist Alice Walker; it also includes more obscure names–people whose works you might have read and not realized that they were African-American.Black History month in books

Frank Yerby was an historical novelist best known as the first African-American writer to become a millionaire from his pen, and to have a book purchased by a Hollywood studio for a film adaptation.  The book, The Foxes of Harrow (1946) became the Oscar-nominated film “Foxes” starring Rex Harrison and Maureen O’Hara.

Samuel R. Delany is an author, professor and literary critic.  His work includes a number of novels, many in the science fiction genre, as well as memoir and criticism.

Octavia Butler (1947-2006) was a Hugo and Nebulla award-winning author of science fiction.

Phillis Wheatley (1753-1784) was the first African-American poet and the first African-American woman to publish a book. Born in Senegambia, she was sold into slavery at the age of 7 or 8 and transported to North America. She was purchased by the Wheatley family of Boston, who taught her to read and write, and encouraged her poetry when they saw her talent.

The publication of her Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral (1773) brought her fame, both in England, and the Thirteen Colonies; figures such as George Washington praised her work. During Wheatley’s visit to England, the African-American poet Jupiter Hammon praised her work in his own poem.

This list is woefully incomplete.  It would take far too much time to list every African-American writer–past and present–whose name deserves inclusion in such a list.  During the month of February I challenge readers to visit the internet or your local library to discover the work of more of the gifted writers whose names belong here and share with PPW what you find.  Who is your favorite?  What genre do they write?

Suzanne Bogue

3 Comments

Filed under Black History, books, genres, poetry, prose, publishing, read, reading, research, short stories, writers